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Old 13th July 2011, 10:11 AM
"The Ripper"
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Wink Re: Best treatment for small plantar fibroma?

I'm sure that there are few podiatrists who would recommend this to you, but on several occasions I have removed small, pea sized fibromas from the soles of my feet myself. These fibromas grow under the skin, often on the ball of the foot or on the heal.

Few podiatrists would recommend this self procedure to you, because this is how podiatrists make their living, and the advice I provide below, would probably be considered to be inconsistent with "professional advice" within the field of medicine.

If you follow my advice, PLEASE REALIZE THAT YOU ASSUME ALL OF THE RISKS OF YOUR ADVENTURE AND ANY CONSEQUENCES, AND I ASSUME NONE. YOU HAVE NOW BEEN LEGALLY WARNED.

SHOULD YOUR FOOT NOT RAPIDLY HEAL WITHIN 48-72 HOURS, OR IF YOUR FOOT APPEARS TO BE GETTING INFECTED, SEE A DOCTOR OR PODIATRIST IMMEDIATELY.

Now here is the procedure.

Take a pair of sterilized, pointed scissors and cut through the surface skin around the entire fibroma. Have some tissue ready because this procedure will cause bleeding in the following stages. Also have a large bandage ready to use.

After cutting through the skin completely around the entire circumference of the fibroma, now use the scissors to begin to pry up on the fibroma, away from the foot. Work around the fibroma until it is approximately half removed or until you can eventually grab onto the fibroma using a tissue between your fingers. The area will begin to bleed. Grab onto the fibroma using the tissue, and RIP the fibroma out of your foot. This is not particularly painful, but it will bleed profusely at first.

Often the fibroma will have a core root that extends a few millimetres into the foot. Try to clear the blood away and check to see if you can see any white remnants of the fibroma which can be removed with the scissors from the deepest area of the excision.

After the blood flow slows, bandage the area of the foot. After 24 hours, remove the bandage and allow air to the area of the foot when sleeping or not walking. For the first 48 to 72 hours, apply a bandage when walking. Walking may or may not be painful during the first day after the procedure.

When you initially remove the bandage after 24 hours, you will see a hole in the skin that extends into the foot. The edges of the cut skin may appear white and swollen, as if soaked in water, from being bandaged. The white edges of the cut skin may be surrounded by mild inflammation. I do not use any medication, but suit yourself. The important part is to keep the area clean before the skin is healed and renewed so that infection is avoided.

The hole in the skin will heal quickly over the next 48 to 72 hours, eventually filling the hole and having a dark thin scab over the newly forming skin. At this point, after 72 hours, when the likelihood of infection becomes low, the bandage can cease to be used.

This area of the foot should completely heal within 2 weeks and the fibroma will appear to be gone. Monitor the area over the next 3-4 months. If the fibroma is going to grow back, you should see and feel it in about 3-4 months.

Repeat the procedure as needed, whenever the fibroma has re-grown to bothersome size. If you are persistent one or more procedures should permanently eliminate the fibroma.

If any of what I have described does not appeal to you, I recommend that you see a podiatrist to have your fibroma surgically removed, with the knowledge that the fibroma may return, even after surgery by a podiatrist, requiring a second or third trip to the podiatrist.

Good luck to you DIY guys!!
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