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Ingrown toenail surgery

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Old 18th November 2008, 03:42 AM
Skivt2 Skivt2 is offline
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Default Ingrown toenail surgery

Had surgery Friday morning due to infection on left foot on the right side of big toe.

I have had a number of near miss infections due to ingrowth on left side of the toe as well over the past few years.

The right side ingrew because the nail is curved. The left side is way too big. Basically my nail is way to big width wise for the space it has to grow in.

The podiatrist recommended cutting the nail top to bottom on both side of the nail while the toe was numbed up to prevent either side from ingrowing for 6 months.

Podiatrist did not kill nail matrix in the corner on either side due to infection on right side. She had me make an appointment for 6 months to do the permanent fix which I am dreading.

It's now Monday night and the left side almost feels like the nail is starting to re-grow ingrown.

Is it possible to know that after three days?

I'm soaking in salt 2X daily and putting antibiotic cream on then bandaiding as directed.

I'm scared because I had the right foot's big toe done 7 years ago but only the left side of the toe, We did kill the nail matrix that time. That was excrutiatingly painful as I believe I'm very sensitive to phenral(sp?) use to kill nail matrix. Liberal doses of codeine could not even begin to touch the pain.

At the two week follow up that time the podiatrist commented that I was healing very quickly and that she needed to do the phenral again. I screamed for hours after the second application due to pain. I am not exaggerating.

The thought of going back in a week for more novicaine shots followed by nail matrix destruction next week is terrifying. The Doc indicated that she could not perform the nail matrix destruction for at least three months after Friday's surgery heals.

Should I be worried? Could it already be ingrowing after three days? What would be the Doc's next steps if it is?
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Old 18th November 2008, 09:46 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

DISCLAIMER:
THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS- ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, AND/OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
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Unless there are some special and unique factors which you have failed to reveal which or are peculiar to you or this problem, the condition you have described, as I understand your comments, was apparently an infected ingrown nail . . a rather common and generally routine matter about which, in several decades of practice, I have never had a patient under my care who has expressed the sort of distress which you seem to have here. I have no way of determining whether this is due to sub-standard care or your dramatic and unusual intolerance for otherwise standard care.

I cannot account for many of the statements which you have attributed to your podiatrist, but I will relate MY routine procedure for this condition. Every doctor has his/her own procedure preference and regimen, so just because your doctor's procedure might have differed from mine does not mean that it was not appropriate.

I drain the infection on the initial visit, generally under local anesthesia, by sectioning the ingrowing side and avulsing it to the eponychium. I then place the patient on soaks, for a few days to a week, rarely employing oral or topical antibiotics unless the patient has complicating factors such as peripheral vascular disease and/or diabetes, and then I bring him/her back for an evaluation of the infection. If, as usual, the infection is resolved, I generally advised a permanent ingrown nail procedure to be performed on the spot . . as, in my experience, if not done then, the next time I see the patient will be for another ingrowing nail infection. I general employ a phenol destruction of the matrix on the side of the avulsed offending nail spicule. I then place the patient on soaks and dressing changes. Phenol is not kind to tissue, and almost everyone experiences a period of some inflammation, drainage and some discomfort, but rarely to the point where strong pain meds are required. Sometimes the drainage resultant from the phenolization is thick and closes off the portal of drainage. This CAN cause a fair amount of pain, and the blockage must be mechanically opened with a simple probing, not generally requiring anesthesia. Final healing often takes a few weeks. In my hands, this surgery is in the range of 75% successful and permanent, so is not uncommon that it requires a second or further procedure.

I cannot answer your specific questions about whether or not the nail can be ingrowing already as I might not be able to rely on your description to relate the precise facts.
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Old 21st November 2008, 04:07 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

Thanks for responding but Whoa!!!!....I sense a bit of a tone.
Quote, "your dramatic and unusual intolerance for otherwise standard care."

I'm having a hard time with your inference that I am dramatizing the experience I had with my previous nail surgery. I found the nail matrix destruction with phenol to be extreamely painful. I'm not the only one. My grandmother told me that, for her, the recovery from this procedure was more painful than having any of her 5 children or either of her two knee replacement surgeries. I have heard this from others as well. It's only about 24-36 hours of that high level of pain however it is a reality that folks experience these levels of pain regardless of whether you are willing to acknowledge it.

Just for comparison, I had an orthopedist take the joint of my toe apart, remove bone chips and sew me back up. I got through that recovery at 13 years old with only Tylenol with codine. Tylenol with codine at maximum safe dosage was unable to relieve the nail matrix destruction pain I experienced as a 35 year old.

Have you experienced the procedure first hand as a patient???????

Moving on.....
The foot that had the permanent fix 7 years ago is fine now. The permanent fix was sucessful.

I am healing well from this new temporary surgery on the second foot and have had very little pain throughout the experience other than the aformentioned nagging feeling that the nail might already be starting to ingrow.

My podiatrist followed the procedure you described below:
"I drain the infection on the initial visit, generally under local anesthesia, by sectioning the ingrowing side and avulsing it to the eponychium."

I am aware that I will need to have the permenent fix done as painful as it was on the other foot. I will insist on receiving two days worth of something stronger than codiene or I will find another podiatrist to perform the procedure who is willing to proscribe the appropriate level of pain relief.

My Podiatrist indicated that I was safe from an ingrown toenail for 6 months. She indicated that she has to wait a minimum of 3 months to do the permanent fix from the date of the temporary procedure. I have an appointment set up for May for the nail matrix destruction procedure.

I'm still wondering:

1) Could it be starting to grow back ingrown already (1 week from the temporary surgery)?
I am not asking you if it is ingrowing. I am asking you if it's possible that it could be. I understand you cannot answer specifically for my toe.

2) Is it possible/likely that I'll have issues within the next 6 months due the fact that I did not have a permanent correction? Again, I'm only looking for your general theoretical opinion as to whether it's likely that an ingrowth will occur within the next 6 months given no permanent fix was performed. I have commitments that would be difficult to complete if an ingrowth occurs within the next 6 months thus my concern.

You say.......
If, as usual, the infection is resolved, I generally advised a permanent ingrown nail procedure to be performed on the spot . . as, in my experience, if not done then, the next time I see the patient will be for another ingrowing nail infection.

3) How long in your experience does the patient usually end up going before the return with a second infection if the permanent correction is not completed at the follow up appointment?
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Old 21st November 2008, 01:07 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I suggest that you take your questions to someone whom you are willing to pay a fee for an answer rather than complaining of "tone" because a gratis responser alluded to the fact that your problem MIGHT, among other alternatives, include your intolerance for the procedure. I don't know, if perhaps you've worn out your welcome with your paid consultant yet. . but I DO know that you've warn out your welcome with ME!
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Old 21st November 2008, 02:58 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I have been performing nail avulsions with chemical destruction of the matrix with phenol for approximately 23 years, and have never had a patient need narcotics or call with a complaint of severe pain following this procedure.

On the contrary, phenol often has almost an "anesthetic" effect, since it in essence is causing a chemical burn and often is burning superficial nerves in the nail bed and area of the nail matrix. Although there is an inflammatory response, in my experience there is minimal post operative pain.

I have found that post operative discomfort is most often caused by two factors.

1) Dressings that are applied too tightly, causing pain and throbbing during the first 24 hours, which is usually relieved upon dressing removal.

2) The "over-use" of phenol causing too much destruction and a chemical burn of the surrounding tissue.

This is NOT to say that you are imagining your pain or did NOT have the pain you described. However, it may have something to do with the technique your particular doctor utilizes. Your doctor MAY expose the tissue to the phenol for a longer time than I do, your doctor may use a greater amount of phenol than I do, etc. Although techniques are always "similar", there are often small differences that can ultimately make a very large difference in patient's post operative experiences.

I also utilize post operative soaks in luke warm (never hot) water and Epsom salt and often also have the patient apply Silvadene cream (if there are no allergies) since I have created a chemical burn. I NEVER have the patient use "Band-Aids", but instead simply have the patient wrap a piece of gauze around the toe to absorb drainage and prevent maceration and prevent irritation from the adhesive on the "Band-Aid". Rarely are oral antibiotics needed.

And if the area was infected and a temporary procedure was performed first, I see no reason to have to wait 3-6 months. The permanent/phenol procedure can be done within a few weeks, as long as the initial infection has healed.
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Old 22nd November 2008, 06:35 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

Thanks Doc D for a responsible answer.

I'm glad to know that my 1st experience may not be typical. I've never taken anything stronger than codine in my life but I will make sure i have something around just in case for that 1st 24-26 hours just to be on the safe side.

My current Doc is new to me. My old doc is not in my medical plan so I had to switch. I can hope that maybe this time it will be different. It's tough when you have folks saying, "this does not hurt" and then both you and your grandmother have similar painful experiences. I do have very strong nails. Maybe that makes it harder to kill the root making it extra painful for me.

As long as I'm OK for the next 6 months with the temporary fix I will be able to get through ski season without missing a ski weekend That is my biggest concern and the real driving reason behind my previous questions. I was mentally prepared to have the permanent fix last week. It would have meant I'd miss the first few weeks of the ski season. I've been worried about a relapse happening before early May because I've got lots of cash invested in ski lift tickets and winter lodging at this point. I've got ski races that i am committed to race in Feb and March. I've got a 10 day ski trip booked in mid-march already.

I don't think I can ski for 4-6 weeks after the phenol procedure due to the race fit on my ski boots (Euro size 24.5 on an american size 8 1/2 - 9 woman's foot) and due to my previous experience with that procedure. Based on nail polish in the summer I think my nails fully re-grow in 3-4 months at most. If I am not likely to make it safely until May than I need to go back now and try to get things fixed permantently before the snow really starts flying. Missing 8-12 weekend ski days in January, February or March is worse than suffering through any amount of pain. Hopefully I'm OK until May with the temporary fix. Thanks again. You sound like a great Doc.


Foot Doc - You are an angry person. If you are going to be unpleasant perhaps you should just say nothing at all. 1st you treated me condesendingly and then you insult me. Was that really necessary? I just asked a few simple questions. If you think it's insulting to your profession for people to ask for free opinions on the net, why do you bother responding to these posts? Do you think you are a superior being compared to the rest of us? You have no idea who I am. If you project negativity out into the world you will receive it back. Karma is real. Stay on the sunny side.
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Old 22nd November 2008, 10:55 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I had two ingrown nails fixed by surgery too and it was only a little uncomfortable and I didn't have any of the sort of problems that you say you had. Also I just can't see any real difference between the answers from the Foot Doc and Doc D that should have made you be nasty to one and think the other one was responsible. Both said about the same thing and that they had never had a patient that complained of about the surgery like you did. From my own experience and the what was told to me by other people before I had my surgery I also think that maybe it was just how you tolerated the surgery instead of the sugery being done bad. I think that the doctors who answer here are not paid for their time and from my reading through posts it looks like to me that they do a pretty good job from what they have to work with. I don't think that you should have answered the first doctors comment by being nasty with him or you should have paid somebody who you could have said whatever you wanted too. If I was giving up my time for free and got a comment back like yours I would have dropped you too.
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Old 22nd November 2008, 02:29 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I'm not really sure I said anything drastically different than "FootDoc", but thanks for the compliments. You must realize that when we answer questions on this site, it often gets frustrating when patients turn their anger toward the doctors when the answers they expect or want aren't always received.

In regards to your response that your nail may have been extremely thick or hard and that may have been the cause of your post operative discomfort, once again I can't find any reason why that should have caused the severe pain you described. Over the many years I've performed this procedure, I've performed it on every type of patient and nail imaginable.

Once again I believe it must have something to do with the actual performance of the procedure, possibly the exposure time of the phenol, inadeuate flushing/dilution of the phenol after application, etc. I do believe you had the pain you described, but I also can state that it is not the "usual" circumstance.

You may want to discuss this with your primary care doctor to see if it's possible for a referral to another provider and discuss the circumstances with him/her.
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Old 23rd November 2008, 02:48 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I had two ingrown nails fixed by surgery too and it was only a little uncomfortable and I didn't have any of the sort of problems that you say you had. Also I just can't see any real difference between the answers from the Foot Doc and Doc D that should have made you be nasty to one and think the other one was responsible. Both said about the same thing and that they had never had a patient that complained of about the surgery like you did. From my own experience and the what was told to me by other people before I had my surgery I also think that maybe it was just how you tolerated the surgery instead of the sugery being done bad. I think that the doctors who answer here are not paid for their time and from my reading through posts it looks like to me that they do a pretty good job from what they have to work with. I don't think that you should have answered the first doctors comment by being nasty with him or you should have paid somebody who you could have said whatever you wanted too. If I was giving up my time for free and got a comment back like yours I would have dropped you too.

It's not that I don't appreciate your support and acknowledgment that the response I got back from the original questioner was rather nasty and uncalled for, but I really discourage this forum being turned into a referendum on the perceived style with which answers are offered rather than the quality of the information given, as it diminishes the usefulness of the venue and is a waste of time which serves no useful purpose other than to engender controversy. It has been my observation that there are some who either feign indignation when they don't get precisely what they desire, or are truly unable to except even the lightest supposition that they have even a minimal degree of responsibility for their complaint. In this case, the questioner seemed to take undue offense to my not being certain if her complaint was the result of inadequate treatment or if it was the result of an intolerance for the procedure peculiar to her, and, indeed, both Doc D and I have several times expressed the fact that in our cumulative more than half-century of experience, we have never encounter a patient complaining so profusely of the procedure in question. In my view, and apparently yours, such a statement of fact should hardly have resulted in offense and certainly not in the nasty comments which followed from the questioner. But this situation was particularly curious, as after she had dissed me, she then went immediately on to say . . and asked me another page of questions, as if she had some entitlement to get both an answer and one in the words she desired. Now would you not think that someone who was so distressed by my first response and gave me grief for it would have the good sense not to ask, mush less want more from me? The whole episode rather reminds me of an old Seinfeld episode where Elaine and her former boss partnered in a bakery that made and sold muffin tops. The problem was that the entire muffin had to be made before the top was cut off, and they had no use for the muffin stumps. So Elaine had the idea that they should give the stumps free to a homeless shelter so that the poor and unfortunate could have some good foot. But the folks at the homeless shelter refused and threw back at them, although they were perfectly good, because they felt insulted that they had not gotten the whole muffin. So, you see . . even in TV sitcoms, no good deed goes unpunished, and I guess some folks simply have the need to look a gift horse in the mouth. But I'll bet dollars to donuts that those, such as this questioner, who are so vociferously indignant in their anonymity with me will keep their mouth closely shut when they are served poorly by the doctors whom they actually pay and who have real obligations to them.I ask no remuneration, and God knows, no one has offered any. I am not here to be your buddy, your personal doctor, your social worker or your psychiatrist. I come here to educate and share my expertise with others without charge or obligation. If all you are looking for is the often gratuitous treatment which is part and parcel of a paid doctor-patient relationship, then you need to seek that sort of arrangement. If what you are looking for accurate information told as and like it is, then you are in the right place.Finally, for those of you are still intent on continuing this battle with me, you will be disappointed, as this is my concluding comment in this thread.
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Old 18th May 2009, 02:02 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I've just had this surgery to remove the full nail perm.
First the toe was numbed with 4 jags, these were pretty painful and put the rubber band around my toe.
Then he started to cut ect ect, when the full nail was removed he applied the phenol and washed with alcohol after the phenol was applied. He told me that i would feel some discomfort and to just take some pain killers when it gets sore.
So i was being driven home, with the anaesthetic still active, i obviously didn't feel any pain, it actually felt warm and quite nice ;D
Then i got home, as the anaesthetic started to wear off i felt a stingy, sharp, small pain at the tip of my toe, which gradually got worse an all around the toe almost. It felt like the pain of the injection.
For about an hour this pain was VERY sore, causing me to grap my toe and rock back and forward like a mad person at points ;P
I've took some pain killers, the pain is wearing off but the pain killers took forever to take action.
I have to keep this bandage on for a week at which point i will go back and see the doctor.
I'm 13 and have had this procedure before on my other big toe but only one ONE side, i didn't feel any pain after the procedure strangely, but this has all changed now ;D.
Prior to the procedure both sides of the toe were ingrown and terribly infected, not my words, the doctors.
Now, To the "Foot Doc"
Your comments are very rude, the pain of this procedure varies as i have experienced, on my first procedure i felt no pain, after this one it was agony. As a Doctor you should be aware of the wide range of pain felt after this procedure and definitely shouldn't say that a patient was "over reacting" or anything similar, I got a leaflet and it said if the pain continues, is very sore and cant be handled with pain killers you should return to the clinic, so obviously the amount of pain described by the first poster is very possible.
I live in the UK and I can assure you that if you told a patient that they were over reacting you wouldn't be looked on so kindly. Also if you lost your patience with a patient after they deny your comments then you are not fit to be a doctor.
Being a doctor requires a whole load of patience and a very good temper, if you flip out at patients you should learn to be more considerate.
I have no doubt that you are a good doctor but hopefully after reading all these comments you will be more considerate to patients experiences, extreme or otherwise.
Thanks
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Old 15th June 2009, 04:40 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

It has been four days since the surgery and my childs toe is still swollen and red from the procedure. I understand that this is normal for the healing. My question is how long should he stay off the tennis court and will not playing help it heal quicker?
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Old 15th June 2009, 07:03 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I would think that the best answer by far could and should be offered by the doctor who is responsible for your child's care. Have you not asked or have you asked and not been satisfied with the answer?
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Old 15th June 2009, 07:13 PM
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We asked and the doctor said that he could not hurt his toe by playing on it, but it may aggravate it or make it sore. He said as long as he feels like playing it would be fine. I was just not sure if it would prolong the healing process. In other words is he stays off of it for a week, would it heal faster than if he was playing on it? His mother says stay off of it until it heals and I am a male that says if he wants to play let him play. It is the whole Venus vs. Mars thing going on here.
Thanks for your input.
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Old 15th June 2009, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Thanks for your input.
How honestly refreshing it is to hear that there ARE sensible folks out there who, when offered a response which perhaps does not meet his/her expectations as to its specificity, can nonetheless appreciate the fact that forum responders are neither a replacement for ones own doctor nor in a position to responsibly make specific recommendations regarding the care of an unknown individual. Thanks for YOUR feedback.
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Last edited by FootDoc; 15th June 2009 at 10:38 PM.
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Old 3rd September 2009, 10:47 PM
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I'm sorry if you may think you have already answered this but I do have a question. I am going in to see a podiatrist tomorrow to have him look at my big toes (I have had six ingrown toenails on them, on both sides of each toe, this summer alone.) he told my mother that he would even have time to perform the permanent procedure tomorrow. However I just realized that I am not sure he knows that the fifth and sixth ingrown toenails of this summer are still going, they are in their end stages but as a general rule will he not perform the permanent procedure if they are not totally healed at the time?

Thank you.
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Old 4th September 2009, 04:31 AM
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DISCLAIMER:
THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS- ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, AND/OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
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I don't know what "end stages" or "totally healed" means, but if you mean that an infection is on-going, it is my policy and protocol not to perform permanent corrective ingrown nail surgeries in the presence of infection. But I certainly cannot speak to your own doctors feelings on the matter.
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Old 21st October 2009, 08:51 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

good afternoon,
I currently am going through 1 whole year of surgical repair that a Podiatrist did and the pain has been unbearable. His initial dx was bone spur under big toe nail, which has not healed and i am working with another podiatrist to fix as he did not shave the bone he broke it. I don't feel you are exagerating at all and i really feel your pain.

Monica
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Old 21st October 2009, 09:16 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

DISCLAIMER:
THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS-ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, AND/OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
************************************************** *********
Dollars to donuts there is something much more serious than an inadvertent fracture of a toe going on here. I cannot discount your pain, as pain is a very subjective and individualized complaint. But what you describe does not generally comport with either the degree of discomfort or the length of problems which you allege. Hopefully, you have had an in-depth discussion of your problem and its prognosis with your current doctor.
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Old 28th October 2009, 12:52 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I wonder if the podiatrist ever treated the ingrown toe nail problem "non surgically".
I have seen on the web products like Nail-Ese and topical creams like Trolarix. I
don't know how reliable these products are. But it seems that the doctors first
always goes for the scapel or knive or rather than grinding them down.
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Old 4th November 2009, 02:54 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

to: Wyopatient, I don't know about doctors using the products, but I did try "everything" for my son's bilateral ingrown nails. He's 12. Soaks, aloe gel, more soaks (trying Domeboro packets, epsom salts, plain water) then, Dr. Scholl's Ingrown Toenail Reliever, more soaks, and finally a trip to the doc for antibiotics (on Labor Day weekend), after which the left side completely cleared but the right remained swollen and painful. Another trip then to a podiatrist (we had to wait 2 weeks for appt.) who trimmed out the left side without local anesthetic (it was fine) and attempted the right side. 2 more weeks of soaks and misery. He had not been able to wear a shoe and had to stay out of gym at school all this time. This past Monday (11/2) he finally had the permanent procedure on the right. He stayed home from school yesterday and today is still in agony.

So, I can only answer you based on this experience of products used, and they were not helpful and did not do the job for him. *On the other hand, I have ingrowns and when they flair up, I use soaks and pure aloe gel with band-aids, and wear sandals. It takes a couple days and they clear up. (I did try the Scholl's product and it actually made it feel worse.) I have to take Plavix for a condition, so surgery is out of the question at present.

For others who are in agony after the procedure, we hear ya! He's generally a very stoic child and has a high pain tolerance. So, this postop pain and his howling in pain was more than surprising. I'm hoping that as the margin heals over the next couple days, he won't be in such misery. Extra strength acetaminophen alternating with ibuprofen give slight relief, but it's still difficult for him to bear weight on that side (48 hours+ after procedure.) He's in a postop shoe now but still hop/limping. So, our experience has been that it's not an easy or painless recovery. My mom at age 80, otoh, had an entire nail removed and recovered very quickly with minimal pain.
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Old 2nd December 2009, 03:05 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I have been experiencing ingrown toenails for about 6 years now. Starting developing these in high school where I was pretty active and sports. I contributed the ingrown toenails to being in physical sports. However, have had all four sides of my big toe done. I seem to keep getting recurring ingrown toenails. I do not have a problem with the procedure, but feel that when my podiatrist has "killed the nailbed" to prevent the problem from recurring, this does not work. My nail regrows and I keep having the same problem months after the appointment. I am getting a little frustrated about the situation when ingrown toenails keep developing. The ingrown section develops halfway down the nail, so I don't contribute it to the way I cut my toenails, straight across for as long as I can remember. I got my foot sized to see if I needed bigger shoes, however this doesn't seem to be the problem either. Any suggestions?
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  #22  
Old 2nd December 2009, 12:17 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

DISCLAIMER:
THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS-ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, AND/OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
************************************************** *********
I'm sure you meant all four sides of your big toeS done, and not your big toe as stated, and I'm sure you meant "killed the nailed MATRIX," and not the nailbed. As with any surgical or medical treatment, results are not always 100 percent. My general advice for those experiencing less than complete success is to have the procedure repeated or one of the many other ingrown nail procedures tried.
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  #23  
Old 5th December 2009, 04:18 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

Hello, besides all the back and forth going on which I am not responding to, I would also like to state my perm surgery I had 4 weeks ago. My toe is still not healed - it is very uncomfortable. It has interfered with my exercising and I am still wearing open toe shoes to work. The other night I clipped my toe on a rough surface and it pulled off the "crusty" part of the skin that was trying to heal. I have never felt so much pain in my 32 years of living. I had to take two prescribed pain killers to fall asleep from the pain. I had frosbite when I was 10 - is this interfering with my healing process?? Or do you think it was overuse of the chemical? Thank you for any help.
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  #24  
Old 5th December 2009, 02:13 PM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

DISCLAIMER:
THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS-ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, AND/OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
************************************************** *********
Four weeks is not an unusually long time for complete healing after a chemical matrixectomy, but certainly any concerns or complaints should be brought to the attention of the attending doctor for his/her consideration rather than someone who has no intimate knowledge of your case. I can have no way of knowing what residual effect, if any, you might have from your previous frostbite, but again, this is something that needs to be addressed by your own doctor and should have been considered prior to surgery.
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  #25  
Old 20th March 2010, 05:13 AM
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Lightbulb Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

Last weekend, if I thought I didn't have enough medical issues, my left big toe kind of hurt. I took the clippers, and clipped the nail. If you think you know pain, you may not know the pain that can come from one stupid toe or nail. It woke me up throughout the night and next day, tingling and throbbing. I looked online, and realized I had an infected ingrown toe nail, although I thought I clipped that part off. It looked funny, I soaked it, I called the foot doctor who said to call him back only if I developed a high fever and did I have any pus? I didn't know what he was talking about and we hung up.

I put on my glasses, I saw some white stuff coming out from under the nail, and that pain was not killed by any narcotics, and then the white stuff, began coming out yellowish. I finally took a leviquin, but it was only until the second one did the pain subside. By Monday, it looked better by the time I went to the covering doctor's associate.

However, the podiatrist took one look at it, brought his nurse in, put a fabric screen in front of my face, and I began screaming as he injected the anesthetic in three different places. I am not sure what happened next, but when I left, I was given instructions, and it hurt a lot when the everything wore off the next day, but the third day, I couldn't get up the whole day. Anybody who called found I didn't know what day it was, and I was in tons of pain, despite my foot being elevated.

My podiatrist said that post-op recovery could take a week when I called him that day, thinking I needed another or different antibiotic. Yes, it is getting better and hurting less at times, but it is taking time to clear up. It was a beautiful day. I could wear a sandal, and yes, I went grocery shopping. It's throbbing tonight.

I saw another doctor today who asked if the infection was cultured, but I don't know, because I was too traumatized from the procedure to ask. I was told sometimes, one antibiotic can take longer to work. I seem to be developing some allergy to leviquin, so I was given Bactrim.

I felt around tonight, and the big toe hurts around the knuckle, too. I assume that pain is attributable to those injections. Who knows, he could have put those big needles into the joint?

I have a stomach condition, and can't take anything non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (like Advil, etc.)

Several years ago, I had plantar fasciitis. I couldn't put any weight on my foot, so I agreed to trigger point cortisone injection treatment (p.s., they didn't work after a few weeks)

I've had trigger point injections in my back, etc., but never in my life was the pain worse to have anything injected into my feet or toe!

I've decided that these feet of ours are very, very sensitive, and it can be tough to discern what may be infection right now, versus soft tissue trauma from the procedure. I hope I won't have another problem, now I know about ingrown toenails, but I certainly don't think I would relish anything like this toe thing ever again.

Don't know how the original posteur of the website, who had multiple long-term infections ever went anywhere like that for so long.

So, the people who are posting here, it is now Friday, I had the surgery Monday, and I still feel it. I can't say I feel or want any of your pain, but I do acknowledge -- IT CAN BE HORRIBLE.

Keep soaking it, I guess. My doctor said to soak it in warm water with Betadine to resemble the color of tea. Someone here, I think, said they used aloe vera gel. I can try that. I have had good luck for other boo-boos with calendula ointment. I may turn to that soon. Good luck!
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  #26  
Old 2nd July 2010, 09:44 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I finally had my bug left toe nail completely removed yesterday (01-06-2010)

A little backround on the bad boy.
I kicked a pressure testing bay door which is about a inch and a half think solid steel.
My boss dropped a heavey piece of equipment on my finger and I was not having a good day so instead of taking him out I kicked the door. I had steel toed work boots on and I felt the big toe either break or the nail lift or something.
After the kick I felt very stupid because now I had a sore foot and finger.
(not my brightest moment I will admit.)
I hobbled away and remoeved my boot expecting to see a broken toe or lots of blood.
Instead I saw the I had a massive blood pool underneath my big toe nail. (The same effect you get when you slam you finger in a door or something.)

I also saw that the nail was broken and I should have removed it but I did not.
The new nail grew in underneath the old broken one and since then I've had a ingrown toenail.
I'd been to have the sides removed twice with the nail growing back every time.
I then decided that I would let the nail grow out.
BIG MISTAKE!!!

I've had this ingrown nail for about 2 - 2.5 years now with it clearing up every now and then but always returning, bigger and badder than before.
It got to the point where it's now affeted my whole life, from work, to play. As a result I've picked up weight and am unhappy.
So the decision to totally remove the nail permanantly was a easy one.
I went to my GP and he said he could do the removal.
He gave me a few injections and made sure the toe was numb.
As soon as he started trying to remove the nail I felt everything.
He then gave me a few more injections and tried again. The pain was unbearable so the decidion was made that I would be knocked out to have the nail removed.
That happend yesterday and the block has worn off and I'm feeling everything now.
The pain is excrusiating, I was up all night howling with pain to the point where I called a emergency helpline to see what I could do.
They were not very helpfull and the pain is still throbbing in my toe.
I was bleeding badly yesterday and my toe was wrapped up pretty good.
But it's so painfull.
All I want to do is remove the banages and see whats going on.
I'm scared that the stiches have torn or something as I can hardly walk.
I dont know what to do.
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  #27  
Old 2nd July 2010, 10:00 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

DISCLAIMER:
THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED GRATIS AS GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY, AND, AS SUCH, MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO THE SPECIFIC QUESTIONER AND/OR HIS/HER PROBLEM. IT IS CLEARLY NOT BASED ON ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE AND/OR EXAMINATION OF THE QUESTIONER OR HIS/HER MEDICAL HISTORY, AND IT CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS DEFINITIVE MEDICAL OPINION OR ADVICE. ONLY THROUGH HANDS-ON PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH THE ACTUAL PATIENT CAN ACCURATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS BE ESTABLISHED AND SPECIFIC ADVICE BE GIVEN. NO DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS CREATED OR ESTABLISHED OR MAY BE INFERRED. THE QUESTIONER AND/OR READER IS INSTRUCTED TO CONSULT HIS OR HER OWN DOCTOR BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH ANY SUGGESTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, AND TO ACT ONLY UPON HIS/HER OWN DOCTOR’S ORDERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. BY THE READING OF MY POSTING WHICH FOLLOWS, THE READER STIPULATES AND CONFIRMS THAT HE/SHE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THIS DISCLAIMER AND HOLDS HARMLESS THIS WRITER. IF THIS IS NOT FULLY AGREEABLE TO YOU, THE READER, OR YOU HAVE NOT ATTAINED THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOU HEREBY ARE ADMONISHED TO READ NO FURTHER.
************************************************** *
Although pain is an individual thing, ingrown toenail surgery is generally rather innocuous. In my opinion, unless the GP had some specialized training, and from just the fact that he couldn't achieve local anesthesia, I would guess he hadn't, your choice of medical practitioner would seem to me to be inappropriate, though I suspect from the date format, you are not in the U.S. (in any event, seems you indicated yesterday was June 1, so check your calendar). Requiring general anesthesia for ingrown nail surgery is ridiculous, so I can make some assumptions from there. I trust you wouldn't have let your GP pull, fill or even clean your teeth. Why would you have a GP perform this surgery? At this point, I have no idea as to what your problem might be, but as your GP is now responsible for your care, I would recommend that you call HIM for instructions.
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  #28  
Old 4th July 2010, 05:23 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I had ingrown toenail surgery yesterday. The procedure itself was not painful because of the local anesthesia. However, after that wore off, it was very painful. Today is my second day post-surgery, and I am still experiencing pain. I am taking over the counter ibuprofen for the pain. It seems to make the pain tolerable. From my own personal experience, I can assert that recovery from a partial matrixectomy is a painful experience. I completely empathize with the original poster. I wish you a speedy recovery.
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  #29  
Old 4th July 2010, 11:15 AM
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Default Re: Ingrown toenail surgery

I don't dispute your personal experience, but having performed what I would judge to be thousands of such procedures, I can tell you that, at least in my hands, your experience is not typical.
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Old 4th July 2010, 11:43 AM
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Default Ingrown toenail surgery

While in the Marines I had a bad ingrown toenail... I hate shots so I didnt go to medical for a long time...I finally went when ater PT for a few days straight I bled through the top toe area of my running shoe...it freakin hurt.

alamed411 is right...the shots they give you in the toe to numb it really hurt, but hey, your toe already hurts but its such a relief to get it taken care of.

I wish I had a how remedy for ya but I dont- Good luck...
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